Baby Skin Rashes and Conditions – Learn all about it

Baby Skin Rashes

The baby’s skin is very soft and sensitive to itching, which often leads to poor skin conditions. Many of them are not harmful and go away on their own. But sometimes a strange stain or impression can be an indicator of something more serious. As a new parent, learning about it will save you a lot of unnecessary stress.

Baby Skin Rashes

6 Different types of rash

The little bundle of your joy is coming out of your womb and spending nine months in your womb before saying ‘hello’ to you! This is a big change for him, and your baby – just like many other children – needs time to adapt to this change. This causes many problems in the skin of the newborn. Here are 7 common types of rashes and conditions for your baby’s skin that your newborn may suffer from.

1. Acne and whiteheads

What does it look like?

Within the first few weeks, your newborn may develop small pimples on the nose, cheeks, and forehead. You may notice small spots on her face (called milia) or on her gums and/or palate (called Epstein Pearl).

What is the reason?

Also known as ‘baby acne’, the acne you see in newborns is not related to oil imbalance (in older children) or hormonal changes. The most common cause of acne in children is a type of fungus. On the other hand, it is also due to the accumulated oil glands.

How it can be treated

Newborn baby acne is self-limiting. This means that the problem does not require medication or medical care and will improve and clear on its own. Similarly, as your newborn grows older, his oil glands will open and the milia will disappear.

2. Red dot or granule

What does it look like?

Occasionally there is a red dot or rash on the skin of children. The red dots look like tiny dots made with a fine-pointed pen.

What is the reason?

Patience is caused by the rupture of fine blood vessels. When the baby gets stuck in your delivery canal, some of its blood vessels may rupture, causing the patella.

How it can be treated

Patella does not require medical assistance or attention. The situation will improve on its own over time.

3. Eczema of the baby

What does it look like?

Eczema makes the skin dry, itchy and irritated. Sometimes there may be small red swollen parts that come out when itching.

What is the reason?

Eczema is commonly seen as an allergic reaction. It is most common in children who have a family history of allergies. Eczema is not contagious but can cause a lot of discomfort for your newborn.

How it can be treated

The best solution for eczema is to avoid triggers: dry air, soap, and detergent. Dress your baby lightly and use soft sheets underneath the baby when he sleeps. The frequency of bathing, use of proper soap and moisturizer, and if the condition does not improve, consult a doctor.

4. Diaper rash

What does it look like?

A diaper rash makes the skin around your newborn’s genitals red and sensitive. Your baby or you may cry if you put your hand on the affected area.

What is the reason?

Moisture is the biggest enemy of a baby’s skin and diaper rash is usually caused by trapped moisture. These can happen if there is enough delay before changing the newborn’s dirty diapers.

How it can be treated

The best way to prevent diaper rash is to make sure you keep your baby diaper-free for at least a few hours each day. Don’t use high absorbent diapers, as someone will keep them in the diaper for a long time, resulting in the diaper rash of the younger ones. Buy the right size of diapers (tight diapers do not allow the skin to breathe).

5. Heat-induced rash

What does it look like?

It is also called prickly or ‘malaria’. It appears as a red or pink rash across the area covered by clothing on the body. It is itchy and can cause a burning sensation.

What is the reason?

Most children get malaria because of the trapped heat. Sometimes mothers tend to wear extra clothes on their babies, even covering them in warm or hot weather. This causes the skin to turn red and the development of thermal rash.

How it can be treated

Bathing in cold water and loose, cool, cotton clothes are a great way to relax. Make sure you are keeping a close eye on your newborn’s skin to allow it to cool down enough, especially after a summer bath.

6. Splitting rash

What does it look like?

The splitting rash can be noticed around the baby’s mouth and above his chin. It makes the skin around the face red.

What is the reason?

As the name implies, the splitting rash occurs if the baby’s saliva and saliva are not cleaned properly and on time.

How it can be treated

A splitting rash is not a very serious problem and does not require medication. Be sure to wipe your baby’s spit off his face and chin (whether it’s saliva during feeding or saliva from other times).

7. Pale skin

What does it look like?

Some newborns fade within the first few days after birth. The condition is also known as “Erythema Toxicum” – it is characterized by small red pus-filled rashes all over the newborn’s body.

What is the reason?

Pale skin can sometimes be caused by extremely cold weather. It is thought to have some connection with bloody skin and harsh detergents but has remained unproven. The most acceptable cause of erythema toxicity is that the immune system is activated when the baby comes out of the mother’s womb and comes in contact with the external environment.

How it can be treated

No specific treatment is required for this faded skin, as it is a self-limiting condition and usually resolves within a few weeks.

8. Scaly scalp

What does it look like?

Also known as the cradle cap, it is characterized by oily, yellowish fibrous-like parts on the scalp of a baby wearing a hat.

What is the reason?

The emergence of hormones experienced by a mother in the last few weeks of pregnancy creates cradle caps in some babies. These hormones sometimes start producing oil in the baby’s skin, which leads to the cradle cap.

How it can be treated

The cradle cap can be treated by scrubbing with oil or shea butter before shampooing with mild baby shampoo. Breastfeeding should also be considered for the comfort of the baby in this condition.

Tips to avoid skin rash in children

Most of the conditions mentioned above are not harmful. They do not need medical care or assistance. There are many things you can do to protect your newborn’s sensitive, delicate and soft skin from being damaged. Here are some general tips.

  • Make sure you keep your baby clean at all times! Bathing may not be recommended for newborns, but use medicated baby wipes.
  • Moisture is the main culprit for most baby skin conditions. Make sure you never allow moisture to seep into the folds of your baby’s skin.
  • Never wear too little or too much clothing for your baby. A babywearing less clothing is more likely to lose skin moisture, while a child wearing too much clothing is more sensitive to excess heat.
  • Don’t be afraid to keep your baby’s skin in the air. Keep her undressed for a while, especially during changing clothes and after bathing (for older children).
  • No matter how incredible it sounds, a baby’s skin doesn’t need to be powdered! In fact, the powder can cause inflammation in the baby’s sinuses or even cause a cough.
  • Babies also need sunscreen because they are also sensitive to sunburn. Consult your pediatrician about this.
  • Buy baby products approved by a pediatrician.
  • Babies never come into direct contact with detergents, indirect contact comes through the baby’s belongings – his clothes, toys, bathing suits, napkins, etc. Make sure you use a very mild detergent to wash your baby’s things (including his toys).
  • Always wash your hands thoroughly before contacting your baby (with a light hand wash, needless to say!) Also, make sure you improve your personal hygiene so that you never become a source of infection!
  • Give your baby adequate and high-quality nutrition to strengthen his body from the inside out.

When to see a doctor

Most rashes go away on their own. It can take about 2 to 6 weeks for the skin condition to disappear. However, if this condition of your baby’s skin is accompanied by other symptoms, it is definitely a cause for concern! Find out if there are:

  • Fever
  • Pain
  • Whining
  • Liquid-filled swollen part
  • If the problem is not less in a month.

Rashes on a baby’s skin, although not very damaging, can look really unpleasant and can cause you a lot of pain and anxiety when you see your baby. But remember, often, this is not a cause for concern! Make sure your baby is well-fed, cleaned, and well-rested, then the rash will disappear very quickly.